Why do women remain underrepresented in the upper part of the earnings distribution despite decades of progress in terms of gender equality? Marianne Bertrand, Professor of Economics, University of Chicago, presents her research on the so-called glass ceiling and why it prevails.

Differences in education, psychological attributes and an uneven distribution of unpaid domestic work have previously been used to explain why women are not as well-represented as men are at the top of the earnings distribution. Marianne Bertrand, one of the world’s most prominent researchers in the field, has studied how these traditional explanations apply today. She has also identified a set of altered structures – both on the labour market and at home – that might explain why the glass ceiling prevails despite progress in gender equality in other domains.
Johanna Rickne, Professor of Economics, the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University (SOFI), and Joacim Tåg, PhD in Economics, Program Director at the Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN) comment from a Swedish perspective.

IIES/SNS International Policy Talks is a collaboration between the Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES) at Stockholm University and SNS with the mission to bring insights from leading international economists to the Swedish policy debate.

The seminar is held in English and moderated by Robert Östling, Associate Professor at IIES.

Participants

Marianne Bertrand, Professor of Economics, University of Chicago Booth School of Business
Johanna Rickne, Professor of Economics, the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University (SOFI)
Joacim Tåg, PhD in Economics, Program Director at the Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN)